Wildflower Cardigan

I love the monthly knit-a-long we do at the shop. The ladies are great, and the projects are always something I wanted to make anyway. That being said, the fact that they move on to a new project every month has left me with quite a few knit-a-long victims. Projects that I started, and worked on dutifully for the month, only to drop like a sack of potatoes when the next month’s project came along.

Meet one such victim.

That is a completed back, completed sleeve, and partial sleeve of Alana Dakos’s Wildflower Cardigan from Coastal Knits.
It’s a very lovely sweater, but it’s 99% stockinette and done in sport weight yarn. It’s boring. I need to line up some really exciting movies to watch while I work on it. About the only “fun” part is the scallop at the bottom of all the pieces.
It only takes four rows though, then it’s back to the stockinette. There will be a few cables and bobbles when I get to the pockets on the front, but they will also be over quickly.
I pick this up for a few rows now and again, but it’s seriously slow progress now that the knit a long is over and there’s no incentive to show progress each weak.

Rustling Leaves

This project has been done for a while.  I just, sort of, forgot that it was blocking on the table and left it there for two weeks neglected to show you.  It’s Rustling Leaves Beret by Alana Dakos from the book Coastal Knits.  There are some seriously beautiful patterns in this book.  Peter, lucky dude that he is actually did some of the test knitting so he got an early sneak peak.  This cute little beret was the February knit-a-long at my LYS.


This is the hat pre-blocking when it had more of a beanie shape.
I used some yarn that I had spun from an Abstract Fiber roving.  The fiber was an alpaca/silk blend that spun very smoothly.  The colorway is called Mt. Hood Rose.  It really wanted to be a fingering weight yarn even though my original spinning plan was for it to be sport.  All for the good since this pattern calls for fingering.
I made one tiny modification to the pattern based on the project notes of other people on Ravelry.  Many had complained that the brim of the hat was loose.  Since alpaca is known for stretching out, I really wanted to combat the possibility of a too-loose brim.  I used a smaller needle than called for for the brim ribbing a US 1 instead of a 2 and did a 1×1 twisted ribbing rather than a standard ribbing since twisting stitches tightens them up.
I was stretching when my brother snapped this picture, it’s not very flattering for me, but it shows the hat nicely.  Notice the beret-y shape now that it’s been blocked.
As soon as I finished knitting I snapped a few quick pre-blocking photos then gave it a quick soak and stretched it around a dinner plate to block it into proper beret shape.  I set it out of the way where the cats wouldn’t bother it then forgot about it became very busy.  When I rediscovered it a few weeks later  it was like getting a new hat for free.  I was happy.
So happy I put it on and took pictures right away, not even caring that it clearly did not match my shirt at all.